P    O    E    T    I    C    O    N
Actual Comments From Emails Sent To Me

Couldn't put it down, and I read it 3 times the first week I got it.—Mike; Wheeling IL

Your book is funny, entertaining, and scary!—Jennifer; Bronx, NY

Great book, once you start reading it you can’t put it down.—Ann; Berlin, CT

It is humorous, entertaining, and intriguing!!!—Terry; Buffalo, NY

Love it. My husband loves it. Best book of rhyming poetry I have ever read.
—Michele; Meriden, CT

Got the book, started reading it, awesome.—Danny; Orlando, FL

The Murder of Ravens so far it is my favorite. I really like Edgar Allen Poe and your sequel
to
The Raven did him justice.—Tabitha; Palm Coast, FL

Love it! The book is great! I love vampires and "The Neck" is so funny!
—Carmen;Wingdale, NY
___________________________________________________________________

THE RESPONSE TO THIS BOOK HAS BEEN PHENOMENAL!  THANKS!
The two books are the
same. The top one is a
Funny cover which the
younger readers seem to
like best and the bottom
one is a
Signature cover
more in line with the
Twilight motif.
STRICTLY FOR FUN

ONE OF THE POEMS IN
MY HALLOWEEN BOOK
HAS MY NAME IN IT.
LET'S SEE HOW MANY OF
YOU CAN FIND IT.
Hint 2:
If you split the
book in half,
A simpler problem
you will have.
Where the content
can be found
Is the half
you look around.
Hint 3:
In this poem
I give a name.
Hers and mine
are both the same.
If you change
your line of sight,
Mine goes left
While hers goes right.
Hint 4:
If you further
split the book
Odds are good
you'll find the one.
Like a teen
who's under age,
Match the page
and now you're done!
Hint 1:
They say a smile
is but a frown
If you turn it
upside down.
If you look with all
your might,
It might not be
from left to right!
ForeWord Clarion Reviews
by
Olivia Boler

       Inside the funny cover and the signature cover, the poems are printed in a Gothic font, which may
inspire the reader to recite the poems aloud, as poems are meant to be read, and either shout them in
menacing glee, if told from the point of view of a vampire or banshee, or whisper them in mournful
tones, if a ghost or Frankenstein’s monster happen to be the narrators.

       Once the reader starts to recite the poems, the power of the words takes over.  Count Lefang, who
laments his vampire existence and his lost humanity, even as blood thirst drives him to kill, narrates
the first few poems
.

       Subsequent poems are written in the voices of other archetypal creatures of darkness, including
witches, ghouls, gremlins, skeletons, werewolves, and mummies. Morales dares to stray into rousing
lyrical territory both in form and subject. Sonnet, sestina, rondeau redoublé, limerick, roundel, haiku,
Pantoum, Terza Rima, and ballad are fair game, and they get coupled with the characters of horror
films. And the poems’ titles are just as fun as the verses themselves, such as “A Triolet to a Vampire’s
Immortality,” “A Douzet from the Werewolf,” and “Ode to My Ghoulfriend.”

       Stretching the boundaries of what counts as Halloween poetry, Morales ventures into ancient
Greek myths of creatures like Medusa and historic Egyptian figures like Imhotep. The poet clearly
enjoys experimenting with a sequel to Edgar Allan Poe’s
“The Raven,” titled a “Murder of Ravens,” in
which things don’t go much better for the tragic narrator. Some poems are funny, some are creepy, and
some are sad, but all of them share an intensity and earnestness that demonstrate Morales’s respect
for the poem as a form of art used to convey story, emotions, and ideas.

       The author of two previous books of poetry, A Reason for Rhyme and The Suicide Sonnets,
Morales is passionate about the rhyming form. In his introduction to Count Edweird Lefang’s Rhymin’
Halloween, he laments the dearth of rhyming verse in modern poetry, fearing it is becoming a lost art. If
the poems in his new collection compel readers to seek out works by Poe or Mary Shelley or Bram
Stoker, then mission accomplished.