Hi, my name is Eddie Morales (a.k.a. edmpoet) and this is my personal website.  This site is for lovers of rhyming poetry, but I
welcome all poets.. Enjoy.
REGULAR WEBSITE
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P      O      E      T      I      C      O      N
WELCOME ALL POETS TO:
CLICK ON ANY BOOK OF POETRY TO ORDER
POEMS FOR EDNA
Reading Mr. Morales' sonnets about life and mostly love written in
response to poems by ESVM, one-half of a conversation about
love and life, is fascinating. You keep wondering as you read what
ESVM said that sparked his response.  Yet, even without her
poems in hand, this book is wonderful.  Each sonnet is fresh and
full of fine images such as, "Nature has contrived to boil our blood
. . . we must comply, so not to nature foil" from
Dear Jane.  From
Columbina, you read, "with ribbons tied to rainbows round her
heart."  I shall reread these sonnets often, remember new gems
from each reading.  If you have ever written a sonnet, you will
truly appreciate what an achievement this book truly is, a
masterpiece

--Lois Read, poet, author of three collections,
Once Upon A Time Is Now,
Breathing Color,
and Walking Barefoot With the Muse
Book Review on AMAZON.COM
POEMS FOR EDNA
A HEART TO HEART WITH MS. MILLAY
04/30/2014
ISBN: 978-1938094033
COUNT
EDWEIRD
LEFANG'S
RHYMIN'
HALLOWEEN
BEST
HALLOWEEN
POETRY
ON
THE
MARKET
SAME
BOOK
2 COVER
CHOICES
<---
SIGNATURE
COVER
OR
--->
FUNNY
COVER
COUNT EDWEIRD LEFANG'S RHYMIN' HALLOWEEN
SIGNATURE COVER ISBN: 978-1938094019
COUNT EDWEIRD LEFANG'S RHYMIN' HALLOWEEN
FUNNY COVER ISBN: 978-0615565163
A CANDLE ON FIRE
ISBN: 978-1938094026
THE SUICIDE SONNETS
ISBN: 978-1467931281
A REASON FOR RHYME
ISBN: 978-0615566924
       If you are looking for the definitive book on Halloween poetry while at the same time looking for examples of the various rhyming forms that exist in any time
period,
then this is the book for you. It has many of the characters of horror, many of the rhyming forms, and all made fun by the author's expertise on the subject of
poetry, and his knowledge of the two makes for a wonderful read. Once you start reading Count Edweird Lefang's Rhymin' Halloween you will not be able to put it
down, and once you finish reading it you will want to read it over and over again.
       It is a rousing lyrical combination of Halloween and poetry, both in form and subject. Sonnet, villanelle, rhyming sestina, rondeau redoublé, limerick, roundel,
rhyming haiku, Pantoum, Terza Rima, and ballad, among others, are fair game, and they get coupled with the characters of horror films. And the poems' titles are just as
much fun as the verses themselves, such as, "A Triolet to a Vampire's Immortality," "A Douzet from the Werewolf," and "Ode to My Ghoulfriend." Some poems are
funny, some are creepy, and some are sad, but all of them share an intensity and earnestness that demonstrate the author's respect for the poem as a form of art used to
convey story, emotion, and ideas. It is also a viable teaching tool as well, which allows the student of poetry to learn about the different rhyming forms in a manner
more conducive to experimentation of the forms. Inside, the poems are printed in a Gothic font, which may inspire the reader to recite the poems aloud, as poems are
meant to be read, and either shout them in mournful tones, if a ghost or Frankenstein's monster happens to be the narrator.

____________________________________________
FOR THE LOVE OF NINE MUSES

Today I would like to share a review of a new book of poetry by the poet,
Eddie Morales.  I was privileged to be given an advance copy of
For the
Love of Nine Muses
.  As many of you may (or may not) have heard, the
author challenged himself to write approximately 80 poems in almost as
many days.  His idea was to examine in a memoir-esque manner, past loves
(with the exception of two ex-wives) ranging from his adolescence to
contemporary time.

His relationship with eight diverse women is documented in ten poems each,
which generally cover the beginning, middle, and end of each relationship.  
The tones of the poems are at times tender and sweet, especially during the
teenage years; at others, passionate and titillating, as the narrator comes of
age as a sexual being.

In the first section on Fiona, Eddie deftly handles the arousal of a teenage
boy--both literally, by plunging into the cold ocean to hide his embarrassing
arousal, and from a literary point of view by using the metaphor of a
caterpillar to describe Fiona's transformation into a butterfly.  Reading the
book over Valentine's weekend, I was reminded of my own youthful
relationships: "we hold hands/ we whisper sweet nothings to each other/  
My arm moves over her shoulder" and budding sexuality.

By the last section, Baybee, the relationship is much more overtly intimate:

"Then, I look at your beautifully exposed body, /
And Baybee, I don't blame the wind, /
Because I'm the one who loved
You up last night."

In many poems, there is a recurring theme of "watching you sleep after sex"
but it is not a creepy voyeurism, but rather a deep appreciation of the beauty
of a woman.  The observant narrator notices details such as "your hair in a
bun" or "the Frederick's of Hollywood stockings / You slide slowly up your
smoothly shaved legs." What woman would not want her lover to really see
and appreciate her!

Beyond the focus on the women, the love, and the intimacy, what really
emerges is a portrait of a man.  This is a man who is intelligent; his friends
nicknamed him "Bookworm."  He loves to read and adores the works of
Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poet, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and other poets.  He
is a researcher, one who knows world mythology and literature and
appropriately sprinkles allusions throughout his poetic works, especially to
emphasize and augment the cultural ethnicity of the young woman who is
the current object of his affection.

This is a man who is a nice guy, "a decent young man."  How do we
know?  Because when a stripper "danced a string away from naked," our
narrator does "nothing but stare at [her] face," particularly, her "panther-like
eyes."  He is a thoughtful man who when he "saw an old man slowly
walking alongside the road,...offered to give him a lift home" which provided
an opportunity to meet Aksharani, yet another young woman from a
different culture, in this case, Mumbai in India.

This is a man who is tolerant and free from prejudice.  He loves
indiscriminately.  He loves black, Jamaican, Latina, and Asian women with
equal passion.  He appreciates culture (be it the poetry of the Harlem
Renaissance, Shakespeare, and the haiku form, or the mythology of India)
and good ethnic foods such as "curry goat, fried dumplings, spicy patties . .
. rice and beans, fried hard plantain," or good old chocolate chip cookies!

Finally, this is a man who is a romantic and an optimist.  He dedicates his
book to "All who have loved and lost and loved and lost and so on."  He
knows that love will come again.  He recognizes that the greatest love is
hope, for "she is someone you should never give up" and "she is my best
muse."

Lara Anderson, M.A., Humanities, The Foote School, New Haven, CT

_______________________________________________________________
THE BURNING OF BISHOP NICHOLAS RIDLEY

     There exists only two sources of Bishop Nicholas Ridley’s life.  If there
are others I couldn’t find them.  One source is a digital eBook called
Nicholas Ridley, Bishop and Martyr, by James Charles Ryle (born May 10,
1816, died June 10, 1900), who was educated at Eton College, Christ
Church, Oxford, University of Oxford.
     
     The second source is the book
Nicholas Ridley, A Biography by Jasper
Godwin Ridley (born May 25, 1920 England, United Kingdom, died 2004),
educated at the University of Paris, Magdalen College, Oxford.  I could find
no evidence Jaspar Godwin Ridley was at all related to Bishop Nicholas
Ridley.
     
     I was able to obtain two hard copies of this book, one which was sold
by a local library in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to a bookstore in the same
city, and the second was from a library in Seattle, Washington sold to a
bookstore in the same city.  Both were in decent condition, and I gave one
copy to a Mr. Frank Ridley, a bona fide descendant of Bishop Nicholas
Ridley.  I kept the second copy.  Mr. Frank Ridley and I are both members
of the Meriden Poetry Society in Meriden, Connecticut.  Meetings are held
every third Wednesday of each month at the Meriden Public Library.  It was
for Mr. Frank Ridley I wrote the poem.

     On October 16, 2013, at the Meriden Poetry Society meeting, exactly on
the 458th anniversary of Bishop Nicholas Ridley’s death by burning at the
stake, for heresy, Mr. Frank Ridley expressed the desire to have one of the
poets in the group write a poem about Bishop Nicholas Ridley.  I decided I
would be one of the poets to do so.  Little did I know what I had gotten
myself into, and the group didn’t realize how seriously I would take the
task.  The first thing I had to do was to find information about Nicholas
Ridley.

     Both books pretty much told the same story about Ridley’s death.  It
was not just the fact that Ridley was burned at the stake, but the fact that
the ordeal had taken much longer that it should have, and that Ridley’s faith
in his God never faltered throughout the entire agonizing event.

     In brief, to detail what happened to Ridley, he was tied to a stake, and
the wood was piled up to his waist, and so tightly packed around him, that
when the wood was set ablaze from underneath, the flames could not rise
above his waist because there was no room for the flames to pass.

     As the fired raged, burning him from the waist down, from the waist up
it seemed Ridley could not burn at all.  Bishop Latimer, who was burned at
the stake alongside Ridley, during the ordeal, would then pronounce the
most famous words in all England:

             “
Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man.  We
             shall this day light such a candle, by God’s grace, in England,
             as I trust shall never be put out
.”

     Bishop Ridley would say, among other things:

             “
In manus tuas, Domine, commendo spiritum meum: Domine,
             recipe epiritum meum.


             “Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit: Lord, receive
             my spirit.”

     These words triggered in my mind the type of poem I would write, the
only one I could use, a heroic crown of sonnets.  It was a challenge in itself,
and to further challenge myself, I decided to make the last sonnet (the
fifteenth sonnet) an acrostic, spelling out the name Nicholas Ridley.  In a
sonnet like the heroic crown, you have to write the last stanza first, and it
took me ten months to write it.

     However, once I had finally written the last stanza, it took me just two
months to write the other fourteen.  The fourteen stanzas still to be written
reminded me of another series of events about another famous person in
religious history.  I likened the fourteen sonnets to the Via Dolorosa or Way
of Sorrows, better known as The Stations of the Cross.

     My heroic crown was perfect for the poem.  It was perfect for relating,
sonnet by sonnet, the sequence of events, from Ridley’s being declared a
heretic, all the way through to his death, the tragedy that occurred in this
man’s religious lifespan.

     Then came to me another idea to complete my task.  As with the
fourteen Stations of the Cross, I wanted a visual representation of each
phase of the burning at the stake, from the moment Queen Mary, also
known as Bloody Mary, declared Ridley and Latimer heretics, all the way to
their deaths.  I wanted to illustrate the scenes, sonnet by sonnet, as well
with pictures, of the burning at the stake of the bishop and martyr, Nicholas
Ridley.

     This Heroic Crown of sonnets, with its illustrations, is the result of my
acquaintance with the Bishop Nicholas Ridley, who was probably, and
maybe still considered, the most religious man of the Protestant Church, or
even of any church.  I finished the poem in time for the 459th anniversary
of the death of Nicholas Ridley, bishop and martyr.
_______________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
THE SUICIDE SONNETS -- I do not profess to know what goes through an individual's mind during those times when that individual is contemplating, for
whatever reason, the futility of living.  I am, by nature, an optimistic person.  As such, I have always intended to live my life to its fullest.  Even so, I can
make a sane and intelligent deduction as to the emotions felt by such an individual.  After all, I too have felt anxiety, depression, fear, and many other
human emotions a person is capable of feeling.  However, many individuals feel negative emotions to the extreme, and have difficulty coping with them.  It
is these negative emotions that I'm concerned with, my reason for this book.  Many of these poems have been inspired by the young, teenagers in
particular.  To be so young and feel life is a futile endeavor is truly a tragedy.  Therefore, I have made an honest and sincere attempt to steer such
negative emotions towards a more positive outcome.
---Eddie Morales
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FOR THE LOVE OF NINE MUSES
ISBN: 978-1938094057
THE BURNING OF BISHOP NICHOLAS RIDLEY
ISBN: 978-1938094040
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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